How would we look if we were living on a different planet of our solar system?

I made a perhaps unusual interpretation of your question, by assuming you’re meaning to ask How would Earth look if we were living on a different planet of our solar system? (I changed my answer by assuming you meant “how would Earth look” rather than “how would we look”.) I will consider the question without the interpreted change at the end.

When you look up at the sky sometimes you can see Venus, our closest neighbor, and a planet almost the same size as Earth. To the naked eye it’s a very bright point of light in either the early morning or early evening sky.

If you were living on Mars and looked in the right direction at the right time of night and year, you would see Earth looking similar to what Venus looks to us now.

Through a large non-terrestrial telescope you could see Earth from anywhere in the solar system as long as it wasn’t behind the sun. It’s brightness would depend on what percentage of Earth was lit with sunlight relative to the observer in space, and how close to you Earth is as both you and Earth go around the sun at different speeds.

Now, let’s revisit the original question, “How would we look if we were living on a different planet of our solar system? “ and take the “how would we look” as is, without interpretation.

That brings up a whole other topic, like would we change over time if we were living on other planets so that we didn’t look exactly like humans on Earth look like now.

But I don’t want to get into that, as interesting a topic it could be, because I don’t think that’s what you were asking

How often do all of the planets repeat their exact positions? For example, how often would the planets be just as they were on any given date/time, like a birthday or historic event?

by Wayne Boyd Studied Physics (college major) & Psychology (college major) at St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, TX

You see, each planet orbits the sun at different speeds. Those planets orbiting closest to the sun, like Mercury and Venus, orbit faster. Further out from Earth, Mars takes about 2 years to orbit the sun. Further out, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune all take progressively longer. Then the sun itself is orbiting the galactic center once every 250 million years, and the Milky Way galaxy is moving toward the Andromeda Galaxy at about 67 miles per second. So no planet will ever be in the exact position it was before, ever. The first image shows the planets orbiting the sun in relationship to our own solar system. The second image shows the planets orbiting our sun in relationship to the sun orbiting the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

How many satellites are there, and which are there on each planet?

If you count all the little nuts, bolts, loose wrenches and pieces of demolished satellites as satellites, then there’s a whole lot of junk floating around Earth. Thousands of pieces that pose a hazard.
spacejunk

Around the moon we have about three functioning spacecraft but have launched far more than that that have, over time, gone dead – perhaps crashed to the surface of the moon. Then we have the odd Juno spacecraft around Jupiter, the voyagers I and II and so on. We’ve put more space junk up there then anything else. This is a fairly accurate artist’s rendition of space junk around Earth.

The Russians have put several probes on Venus, the Americans and Europeans put a probe on Titan, we have probes on Mars, we flew a probe by Pluto and orbited Saturn for a long while before crashing deliberately. We presently have, as mentioned, the Juno spacecraft around Jupiter. We have hundreds of functioning satellites in orbit around Earth.

What would happen if NASA had the U.S. Military's budget?

We spend 600 billion dollars every year on the military. What would happen if NASA had that kind of money? Here’s a very cool YouTube video that I love to watch!
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chLOgj8xjx8&w=854&h=480]

Why is there a stigma around attempting to discover extraterrestrial life?

There is no stigma. All of science is dedicated to discover extraterrestrial life. We would be completely excited to find even a fossil of a microbe from space because it would be the ultimate affirmation that life can evolve from matter on another world other than Earth. Our best hope at present is to find some kind of life on one of the moons of Jupiter or Saturn, or perhaps some fossils on Mars as of yet undiscovered. We are even spending billions of dollars with the SETI program to listen for radio waves from space!

However, much to the surprise and dismay of scientists, we have yet to discover anything at all.

Perhaps human race's home was not Earth in the first place, but in another planet, and we came here to prevent extinction

Mechanical, intentional interstellar travel is unlikely since the distances are far too great to imagine. The best anyone could achieve is interplanetary travel within one’s own solar system. Therefore, if we pass the buck and say life didn’t start here but started somewhere else and arrived here, it would have had to arrive on a rock or asteroid as a microbe and somehow survive a fiery entry through Earth’s atmosphere and it would have had to survive the vacuum and temperature extremes of space. If the rock came from outside the solar system it would have had to survive a long, long time.