Do you think human beings will invent a way to travel through space fast enough to reach far away galaxies or they will invent an alternate way to travel through space and time?

Wouldn’t it be great to travel at Warp speed?

The answer to your question, surprisingly enough, is not necessarily “No, humans will never invent a way to travel through space fast enough to reach far away galaxies.”

Here’s the deal. The faster you go, the slower you age, so if you could go almost the speed of light, then it would still take you millions or billions of years to fly to other galaxies from Earth’s point of view, but not so for you who are traveling in the spacecraft. For you the time would be dilated.

Look at an example introduced by Albert Einstein. Consider two twins, named Biff and Cliff. On their 20th birthday, Biff decides to get in a spaceship and take off into outer space, traveling at nearly the speed of light.

He journeys around the cosmos at this speed for about 5 years, returning to the Earth when he is 25 years old.

Cliff, on the other hand, remains on the Earth. When Biff returns, it turns out that Cliff is 95 years old.

Similarly, Biff could travel to other stars and galaxies if he could somehow go fast enough, but meanwhile whole civilizations, humanity and even Earth itself would grow old and cease to exist. So when Biff gets there, Cliff will be long gone. Biff will have traveled forward in time as his spaceship zipped through the cosmos.

Traveling fast enough will slow time down for the astronaut.

Scientists say we can never reach exoplanets, but is it possible to send probes to nearby stars?

Is it possible to send probes to nearby stars?

Yes, and no. We can send probes out of our solar system as we did with Voyager I and II, and theoretically we can direct future probes toward specific exoplanets, but alas.

The distances are so great, even for the nearest exoplanets, that we will all be long dead before they ever reach there.

How’s that I say? I mean, Proxima Centauri is only 4.2 light years away! That’s very close astronomically speaking, isn’t it?

Voyager I is the fastest of the two Voyagers. It travels about 3.6 AU per year, one AU being the distance from Earth to Sun. Proxima Centauri, also known as Alpha Centauri C, is about 268,770 AU. That would take a craft traveling the speed of Voyager I about 74,658 years to reach Proxima Centauri.

So theoretically we could send a probe out there, and when it arrives it could send a signal back to Earth. That signal would take 4.2 years to reach Earth, but would be more than 74 thousand years from now. Who knows if humanity will even still be here by then or if anyone will be listening?

That’s just the nearest exoplanets. Others are much more distant than that.

Will an alien invasion by secular and militaristic extraterrestrials solve a lot of problems on Earth?

An alien invasion by secular and militaristic extraterrestrials would solve one of the biggest problems we have here on Earth. That problem being: does life exist on other planets? Finally we would have an answer!

If aliens in our galaxy are exponentially super advanced, why have they not completely colonized the entire Milky Way by now?

Well, let’s not put the cart before the horse. Right now we don’t know for sure that any life exists anywhere other than Earth. We suppose it does by mathematical calculations, but we haven’t even found a fossil of a microbe from space.

Secondly, suppose there is some super advanced civilization (your use of “exponentially” doesn’t seem to make any sense), the reason they probably haven’t completely colonized the entire Milky Way Galaxy is that for them, as for us, the laws of physics make it pretty much impossible to achieve interstellar travel because of the vast distances involved. And even if they could colonize some surrounding systems by now, it would take light and radio waves 100,000 years to reach us from the other side of the galaxy.

Have the space missions carried out to date ended up as well as possible, and, for that reason, there haven’t fortunately been any fatalities in space?

Would it be possible to put a person on the moon for a prolonged period of time?

We are too heavily influenced by science fiction writers, movies and XBox to see it for what it is.

Space. The final frontier.
One day in our futures humans will travel to other planets, terraform them and colonize them. We will spread out and our species will survive, even if our own sun blows up. We have to start somewhere. We’ve been to the moon once. Let’s go again. Let’s live on the moon.
That would be very difficult. We would need a way to supply our moon resident with food, water and food. Perhaps it could be as we do now with the International Space station (ISS), i.e. fly up supplies once in awhile.
The problem is that the ISS is in low Earth orbit at 249 miles above mean sea level. The moon, on the other hand is between 225,623 miles at it’s closest, and 248,855 miles at it’s farthest, and is moving away from Earth at a rate of 1.5 inches per year. The moon is more than 906 times further than the ISS.
Taken distances into consideration, I would say it is not practical to have a living human being on the Moon for an extended period of time unless he could somehow grow his own food, and get oxygen and water locally.
We are too heavily influenced by science fiction writers, movies and XBox to see it for what it is. Hopeless.
The answer to your question, sadly, is no.
Man-on-the-moon

Do you think people can really live on Mars?

No, of course not. Hollywood wants us to think so, but sadly, or gladly, this is not and never will be possible.
Mars is a poisonous planet with no liquid water. It is hundreds of degrees below zero at night. You cannot breath the air. You cannot grow food. You cannot make goods there. Everything would have to be imported from Earth at great expense just so a few nuts can go and live.
It’s not happening.