Scientists say we can never reach exoplanets, but is it possible to send probes to nearby stars?

Is it possible to send probes to nearby stars?

Yes, and no. We can send probes out of our solar system as we did with Voyager I and II, and theoretically we can direct future probes toward specific exoplanets, but alas.

The distances are so great, even for the nearest exoplanets, that we will all be long dead before they ever reach there.

How’s that I say? I mean, Proxima Centauri is only 4.2 light years away! That’s very close astronomically speaking, isn’t it?

Voyager I is the fastest of the two Voyagers. It travels about 3.6 AU per year, one AU being the distance from Earth to Sun. Proxima Centauri, also known as Alpha Centauri C, is about 268,770 AU. That would take a craft traveling the speed of Voyager I about 74,658 years to reach Proxima Centauri.

So theoretically we could send a probe out there, and when it arrives it could send a signal back to Earth. That signal would take 4.2 years to reach Earth, but would be more than 74 thousand years from now. Who knows if humanity will even still be here by then or if anyone will be listening?

That’s just the nearest exoplanets. Others are much more distant than that.

GPS Block III on Hold

Since GPS achieved Fully Operational Capability on July 17, 1995, GPS has become an essential navigational tool for civilians and military alike. Keeping the system up-to-date has proved to be a problem. Originally the system was supposed to be up and running in February of 2016 but has been delayed at least until 2023.
The latest iteration of the GPS satellite array is called GPS Block III. These satellites must be launched (and will greatly increase navigational accuracy) in order to keep the Navstar global positioning system operational.
The satellites have already been built by Lockheed-Martin and consist of ten new, advanced satellites to be launched into orbit by SpaceX Falcon rockets. The hold up is the U.S. government wanting to make sure the hardware actually gets up there as they independently seek to confirm the safety and reliability of the SpaceX rocket systems.
The new GPS satellites will boost additional easier to track signals for civilian navigational uses and a Military code (M-1) providing anti-jamming security use for the military.

Will an alien invasion by secular and militaristic extraterrestrials solve a lot of problems on Earth?

An alien invasion by secular and militaristic extraterrestrials would solve one of the biggest problems we have here on Earth. That problem being: does life exist on other planets? Finally we would have an answer!

If aliens in our galaxy are exponentially super advanced, why have they not completely colonized the entire Milky Way by now?

Well, let’s not put the cart before the horse. Right now we don’t know for sure that any life exists anywhere other than Earth. We suppose it does by mathematical calculations, but we haven’t even found a fossil of a microbe from space.

Secondly, suppose there is some super advanced civilization (your use of “exponentially” doesn’t seem to make any sense), the reason they probably haven’t completely colonized the entire Milky Way Galaxy is that for them, as for us, the laws of physics make it pretty much impossible to achieve interstellar travel because of the vast distances involved. And even if they could colonize some surrounding systems by now, it would take light and radio waves 100,000 years to reach us from the other side of the galaxy.

How will space be used for military purposes in the future?

It already is being used for military purposes right now as in spy satellites. Even very recently SpaceX was tasked to launch a U.S. spy satellite into orbit but it exploded and the satellite didn’t make it.

In 1984 a Titan 34D rocket launched the KH-9 and KH-11 satellites for “reconnaissance,” and the DSP-2-6R satellite for missile detection. The list just starts there and goes into the hundreds including many intelligence-gathering satellites and so on.

And, by the way, not just by the United States, but other governments as well.

Furthermore, the Chinese government once shot a missile to destroy their own satellite in space just to say the could, and they succeeded, vastly increasing the dangerous debris cloud floating now in orbit. It was a military demonstration.

Edit addendum: The government of India has recently done the same foolish thing – shot down a satellite to prove they could do it – increasing the amount of space junk exponentially.

Have the space missions carried out to date ended up as well as possible, and, for that reason, there haven’t fortunately been any fatalities in space?

The Moon is not as Close as you Think!

Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune could all fit in the gap between the Earth and our Moon with about 4,990 miles to spare

Think of Earth as a basketball and the moon like a tennis ball. How far would you have to place them apart to approximate the distance between the Earth and Moon? Five feet? Ten feet? Twenty feet? Nope! Further even then that! A tennis ball would then have to be about 24 feet from the basketball to be of the proper scale. Farther than most people visualize.
This is how it looks (See image). Kind of surprising. The moon looks bigger to us than that, doesn’t it? Well, no it doesn’t. Our minds eye just makes it look bigger. Hold your thumb out at arms length. The tip of your thumb at that distance more than covers the moon. Still, the moon is the biggest thing in the night sky, and it really stands out much brighter and bigger than all the stars, relatively.
Surprisingly, people really do think the Moon is closer to the Earth than it is. You can see from the photo taking a “mere trip to the Moon” is no easy task!
Here’s a statistic for you! Think how big Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, the gas giants, are in relationship to our tiny Earth.
Yet our Moon is so far from Earth that Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune could all fit in the gap with about 4,990 miles to spare (using the average Earth-moon distance of 238,555 miles).
Solar_System_3

How Big does a Moon Have to Be?

Not very big! It would just have to be natural. Not made by man! And it wouldn’t have to be there for very long either. Just long enough for it to be in orbit.

The astronomical community doesn’t have a definition for moon other than it has to be a natural object. Thus captured asteroids can be moons. It’s even possible for a moon to have a moon!

Mars has two moons, neither of which are large enough to be round. Objects in space get round due to their own gravity. The first image above is Deimos and the second is Phobos, the Martian Moons. Deimos (top) is the smallest. It has a mean radius of 3.9 miles.