Is the Earth flat or spherical? Logically, what makes more sense is an Earth that is a flat, stationary plane or an Earth that is a spinning, spherical ball?

A Spherical Earth would require gravity which we don’t see or can not prove. A Flat Stationary Earth is “what you see what you get” You see a Flat Earth with no curve. You do not feel the Earth to be moving. Easier to explain therefore occam’s razor would suggest a flat earth is what we live on.


Here is my answer to the above:

Which makes more sense to you? An Australia that looks like this from your flat earth map? (see image below)

Or an Australia that looks like this which are the correct proportions for that continent? (see image below)

One of many problems with your flat earth map is it distorts the southern hemisphere greatly because you’re trying to make something spherical look entirely flat.

Or what about this image which correctly shows the size and dimension of Antarctica? (see image below) Did you know we have people living in South America, including an American station.

In the image below is a photo of the station called Amundsen-Scott Station, located 300 feet from the south pole. At the south pole there are about 2 miles of ice over dry land, and because it’s a glacier, it’s slowly moving south at a distance of about 10 feet per year:

Below is a picture of where this station is located:

(Picture courtesy By Teetaweepo; adapted by H Debussy-Jones (talk) 08:53, 14 November 2009 (UTC)) In this image you can also see all of the other active station on Antarctica. So despite what you’ve been told, Antarctica is not “a wall of ice” preventing you from finding the Earth is flat. It’s a continent, full of ice and mountains of rock. There is dry land there, too.

Author: Wayne Boyd

Wayne Edward Boyd was born in Morristown, New Jersey in 1953. He is a published author, former ISKCON sannyasi, and traveler, having lived on 3 continents and visited 37 countries. He presently lives in Amarillo, Texas working as a correctional officer and has interests in photography, political science and astronomy.

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