Did Amelia Earhart Survive? No.

According to an article in NPR, the recent flurry in the news that Amelia Earhart survived a 1937 plain crash does not match historical records and is an incorrect assumption.

An undated photo in the U.S. National Archives ignited speculation that Amelia Earhart survived a 1937 crash, but the same photo appears in a book published two years before Earhart disappeared.

“A Japanese military history buff has found library records showing a photo supposedly depicting Amelia Earhart survived a crash landing in 1937 was actually published two years before the famous aviator vanished,” so says the NPR article. The photo was the basis of a History Channel show suggesting that Earhart had survived the crash.

Amelia Earhart set out to be the first woman to fly around the world in 1937. Her flight went down somewhere in Asia and she was never heard from again. The mystery of what happened to her remains to this day. It had previously been assumed she crashed and died, but a show on the History Channel challenges that conclusion based on a photograph. In the photo, a woman with her back to the camera is said to be Amelia Earhart.

However, a Japanese blogger has found the same photo featured in the History Channel series was actually taken in 1935, two years earlier, a fact not mentioned in the TV show.

It appears we still don’t know exactly what happened to Amelia, but she wasn’t captured by the Japanese.

Author: Wayne Boyd

Wayne Edward Boyd was born in Morristown, New Jersey in 1953. He is a published author, former ISKCON sannyasi, and traveler, having lived on 3 continents and visited 37 countries. He presently lives in Amarillo, Texas working as a correctional officer and has interests in photography, political science and astronomy.

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