Who are they and where do they come from? 

ufo-overwater

Who are they? Where do they come from? First, let’s talk common sense, then I’ll tell you why, in my family, people believe in UFOs.

They’re not coming from space.

I’ve written many articles on how the vastness of space is not traversable because a light year is a lot further than people really think. My conclusion as a layman with some background in science, and after following the writings of many astrophysicists and astronomers and pragmatists, is that UFO’s, whatever they be, are not from other planets.

We are not being visited by aliens simply for the same reason we are not visiting them. Neither knows the other exists and traveling the vastness of space would take many lifetimes. Why do I say that?

Our closest star, Alpha Centauri, is about 4.4 light years away. That number “4.4” misleads us to think that’s not very far, but it’s further away than you can imagine, and that’s just the closest star. This is a distance of about 5.88 trillion miles away, and there’s another number we can deal with: 5.88 (trillion miles).

Let’s see how long it would take to travel that distance and go the fastest we can.

We’ll start with the correct assumption no one can go faster than light. This is not some “law” of physics that can one day be “broken.” It’s just the way things are. Period. For us, for aliens.

So far the fastest we’ve ever gone was on July 4, 2016, when the Juno spacecraft, assisted by Jupiter’s gravity got up to approximately 165,000 miles per hour (265,000 km/h), breaking all previous space speed records. Previous to that the record was 157,000 mph set by the 2 Helios spacecrafts as they sped near the sun in the mid 1970s. These are the fastest speeds we can achieve, and they are done with gravity assists.

But that’s not fast enough to get to Alpha Centauri. Let’s somehow figure a way (the science is not there at present) where we could go not 10, not 20 but 81 times faster than the fastest speed we’ve ever before achieved. (That’s like going from 60 mph in your car to 4,861 mph – kinda fast.)

This would put us at around 13.3 million mph. This speed is phenomenal and quite honestly, not achievable even using gravity assist. It also happens to be 2% the speed of light. This speed is not realistic, but this is just for theoretical thought. The closer we get to the speed of light the more energy you need to the point of requiring infinite energy at the speed of light. Let it be known that going 81 times faster than the Juno spacecraft did is an unachievable speed.

Now we’re zipping toward Alpha Centauri at 13.3 million mp/h, 81 times faster than any craft built by humans have ever gone before. We’ve incredibly somehow achieved 2% the speed of light.

Bear in mind there are two problems we haven’t and will not address, but equally worth considering, is the time and energy need to both achieve this speed and then slow down from that speed at the other end of the journey. Deceleration takes as much energy as acceleration.

Never mind that for now. Let’s just say we can zip up to that speed and zip down to zero in nothing flat. Even at this incredible speed of 13.3 million miles per hour it’s going to take us 2,200 years each way to get to Alpha Centauri.

Now there’s a place more likely to have at least Earth size planets than Alpha Centauri. That would be the Trappist-1 system at 40 light years distant. That’s going to take 20,000 years each way. And this is just our neighbor.

Therefore, speaking realistically, practically, interstellar space travel is science fiction. The distances are too far both for us, and for any intelligent beings that might be out there 1 million or 8 billion light years away.

UFO people are kooks, nutjobs, conspiracy theorists, fanatics and prone to bad science and even fraudulent claims. In these days of digital imagery where we can realistically depict people flying all over space on the big screen, I’ve never seen an image of a UFO that I couldn’t do a better job creating on my Linux computer using GIMP.

That’s the party line. The science of space distances is outlined above. Nobody is visiting us from outer space.

So then who are they and where do they come from? 

I have a problem in my personal life. My mother-in-law, her son, my brother-in-law, and my father-in-law, all claim they saw one up close and personal. The story is famous in my family. My wife says, “Okay, so with all this science stuff you talk about, how do you explain what they saw? You know my mother. She’s not the kind of person to make up stories.”

So what do I do with that?

Here’s the story as told to me by two of the eye witnesses. I know, it’s anecdotal, but how does it figure in with my worldview?

Once, while on an early morning fishing expedition in the 1950s in a remote area of Missouri, USA, my mother-in-law, her husband and son, were headed through the darkness to a lake where they hoped to catch some fish.

When they came out into a clearing at the lake’s edge, there in the moonlight, hovering 3 feet above the water, was a metallic saucer shaped craft with lights going all around it.

The lake was only a few hundred feet across, and this hovering thing with the lights wasn’t making a sound. The water was not disturbed, but it was clearly levitating. The three of them began to walk all around the shoreline looking at it from all sides, when suddenly, after about 15 minutes, it began to rise up, slowly at first, and then zip blindingly fast into the sky and was gone.

That’s the story. Now these people aren’t making this stuff up. They never told anyone except family members – people like me. The story can’t be found in an UFO conspiracy books. They were not kooks.

And then what about that front page New York Times report about a secret Pentagon program and some “artifacts” being stored in modified buildings in Las Vegas? Hmm?

I don’t know. You just have to be like me. Scratch my head.

Maybe there is stuff going on that science doesn’t quite get, yet, like God and religion and UFOs.

Author: Wayne Boyd

Wayne Edward Boyd was born in Morristown, New Jersey in 1953. He is a published author, former ISKCON sannyasi, and traveler, having lived on 3 continents and visited 37 countries. He presently lives in Amarillo, Texas working as a correctional officer and has interests in photography, political science and astronomy.

6 thoughts on “Who are they and where do they come from? ”

  1. The other factor is that the human body turns to mush over time away from the earths gravity, electric and magnetic field, etc…
    As Chief Seattle said, “Man does not own the earth, it’s the earth that owns man!”

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  2. I fear that UFOs are just that: objects that have not been identified. Much as I enjoy sci fi, I’m not a great believer in visiting aliens either, for the reasons you give. But maybe, one day, some one (us or them) will think really ‘out of the box’ and come up with another way of getting there, or here.

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  3. I don’t know what they saw; I’m saying only, as you do, that it was very unlikely to be an extra-terrestrial spacecraft. I do know there’s a condition of mind called pareidolia, which refers to people seeing what they want to see. Nothing to worry about there – refer for example to my article on this site https://bookheathen.wordpress.com/2017/08/29/pareidolia/
    A few years ago, I went to a writers’ seminar at which there was one man who told us all quite seriously that he’d been kidnapped by aliens. Now, THAT is weird!

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