How can you see the International Space Station at night with your naked eye from earth?

So you want to know how you can see the International Space station with your naked eye even when it’s dark on Earth?

Very easily, because up there the sun is still shining while you’re in the dark. Kind of like seeing the peak of a mountain in the sunlight while the valley has long ago become dark. The ISS does go dark too, but there’s a period when it’s dark where you are and light where it is.

Once I had a cat caught on the roof of my house. It was early evening and dark. I got a ladder and climbed up to the roof to rescue the cat when this mysterious, very bright light moved steadily, silently and perfectly straight across the sky. It was, of course, the ISS, which was at that time directly over my head. It was awesome.

2017 Orionid Meteor Shower

In 2017, the Orionid meteor shower will be visible from October 2 to November 7. The shower is expected to peak on the night of October 20 and early morning of October 21.

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Halley’s comet causes the Orionids.

NASA/ESA/Max-Planck-Institute for Solar System Research

 

When Can I See the Orionids?

Orionids tend to be active every year in the month of October, usually peaking around October 20. At its peak, up to 20 meteors are visible every hour.

The best time to view the Orionids is just after midnight and right before dawn.

The Funny Thing about Solar Eclipses

I took time off and traveled to Missouri with my wife and dog Brandi to witness the Great Eclipse of 2017, which we also watched with my stepson Chris. I’ve posted pictures of this event. Here are some more.

What you might not know is the difference between a solar eclipse, lunar eclipse and apocalypse.

That being said, during the partial eclipse phase I mentioned to Chris what I had read on the Internet. According to sources, light filtered through gaps in a tree’s leaves project the actual eclipse.

We tested this theory and came up with this, confirming it’s true. Take a look.

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Are there objects in the solar system revolving around the sun that do not lie on the planetary plane? How would we know, except in the rare coincident that our paths intersect?

Yes, of course. One example rarely considered is the Oort Cloud, pictured below. The Oort cloud is thought to contain objects that occasionally become dislodged to become long-period comets. It surrounds us like a giant sphere, well beyond Neptune and any known planets.

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How do I explain how we can see the moon during the day to my teacher?

How can you explain how we see the moon during the day to your teacher? The moon is visible in daytime because the apparent brightness (m) of reflected sunlight off the surface of the moon essentially exceeds the brightness of the blue sky, unlike the stars. That’s your simple answer.

Apparent brightness is the brightness we perceive after light passes through our atmosphere to our eyes.

Our sun and objects that reflect our sun’s rays are very bright in comparison with their surroundings. Any magnitude below -4 cannot be seen in daytime (the lower the number the brighter the object). Our sun is -26 and the full moon is -12.5, well above the magnitude necessary to see in daytime, -4. The brightest star has a magnitude of -1, dimmer than the required -4 magnitude required to be seen in daylight. All other stars are dimmer still.

Make sense?