How would we look if we were living on a different planet of our solar system?

I made a perhaps unusual interpretation of your question, by assuming you’re meaning to ask How would Earth look if we were living on a different planet of our solar system? (I changed my answer by assuming you meant “how would Earth look” rather than “how would we look”.) I will consider the question without the interpreted change at the end.

When you look up at the sky sometimes you can see Venus, our closest neighbor, and a planet almost the same size as Earth. To the naked eye it’s a very bright point of light in either the early morning or early evening sky.

If you were living on Mars and looked in the right direction at the right time of night and year, you would see Earth looking similar to what Venus looks to us now.

Through a large non-terrestrial telescope you could see Earth from anywhere in the solar system as long as it wasn’t behind the sun. It’s brightness would depend on what percentage of Earth was lit with sunlight relative to the observer in space, and how close to you Earth is as both you and Earth go around the sun at different speeds.

Now, let’s revisit the original question, “How would we look if we were living on a different planet of our solar system? “ and take the “how would we look” as is, without interpretation.

That brings up a whole other topic, like would we change over time if we were living on other planets so that we didn’t look exactly like humans on Earth look like now.

But I don’t want to get into that, as interesting a topic it could be, because I don’t think that’s what you were asking

Is there still interest in sending astronauts to the moon, or is most of the effort now focused on a manned mission to Mars?

by Wayne Boyd

Many others could answer this question better than what I can say. I’d only point out the person asking the question has it backwards in his/her question.

Agreed, in the mind of the public we’re all getting ready to go to Mars. But that’s not what’s really happening. NASA is gearing up to go back to the Moon, not Mars, just the opposite of what the person is asking.

Now I know we hear Elon Musk talking about starting some kind of permanent encampment on Mars, and I know he has plans to go there himself. Elon Musk’s company SpaceX is a NASA contractor, but that doesn’t mean NASA isn’t focused more on the Moon than Mars.

NASA’s idea is to establish a working settlement on the Moon, kind of like having astronauts living on the International Space Station now.

How would life be for us if we were to colonize a super-Earth, assuming the planet is not too far from ours?

by Wayne Boyd – Philosopher, blogger, published author

I don’t know why I’d want to move over to that planet. I’d rather keep working to make things better on this planet. Also, I imagine it might be pretty expensive to move, then I have to buy some land and a house over there, make new friends, and so on. Too much trouble for me.

So to answer your question “How would life be for us if we were to colonize a super-Earth” I would think some people would migrate over there and some people or most people would stay here. I mean, people already have their lives set up here, why move over there?

Would Elon Musk be the most important person to have ever lived if he successfully colonized Mars with 1 million people?

If Elon Musk did colonize Mars with 1 million people, would he be the most important person to have ever lived?

I would then think of him like maybe Christopher Columbus, or the Pilgrims from England that started populating North America. Outside North America these people are not seen as important (or even known). Schools in other parts of the world don’t teach much about this.

Here in America, however, we have Columbus day to remember the crossing of the Atlantic in 1492 by Christopher Columbus, and Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts to remember the first landing of the Pilgrims who came from Plymouth, England. We have Thanksgiving to remember a mutual celebration between the Pilgrims and the local Native Americans after the Pilgrims had their first successful growing season.

So I would say that to the people of Earth Elon Musk would not be the most important person to have ever lived, but to the people of Mars he would be the most important person for the first few generations, but as time passed he would be seen from an historical point of view and remembered on future Martian calendars by the people of Mars.

Here on Earth he would be remembered in history books, too, but so many people have come and gone in the history of mankind. Many people in the past have been very transformative, but overall are not seen as the most important persons. People like Alexander the Great, Issac Newton, Albert Einstein, Walt Disney, George Washington, Queen Victoria, ad infinitum, have all been very important in the history of mankind, but none stand out over time as the most important person to have ever lived. So will it be with Elon Musk even if he did colonize 1 million people on Mars.

What will be the main economic gains of colonies on Mars, or the Moon?

You don’t want me to answer this question. You are looking for a great, positive answer that will make the future look bright not only for colonies on these places, but an economic base for those colonies.

Meanwhile, I’m going to say I don’t think there’s much justification even for people walking on Mars when our robots can do it more safely and less expensively and achieve the same or better results…. what to speak of “colonies.” I think it’s almost laughable and mostly just science fiction dreaming.

People may or may not one day walk on Mars at great risk, and some will probably die in the attempt. There is little reason to go there from a scientific point of view other than to say we did, just like we walked on the moon and then went away.

In the meantime, a safer, cheaper way is send our machines to go.

You see, what this is all about is finding life. What scientists want to do is prove that life can evolve elsewhere than Earth – a so far unproven theory. We want there to be life elsewhere because we want to prove that life was not “created” on Earth alone, but life naturally develops from matter when conditions are ideal.

We don’t need “colonies” or economic bases in space to prove that. We just need to find some germs under some rocks or on some moon around some planet in our solar system. For that we just need space vehicles and robots like the Mars Rovers.

Whether we find life or not is anyone’s guess, but it is still science fiction thinking we will colonize anything off planet.

If just .001% of 10 billion Earth-like planets orbiting sun-like stars in the Milky Way have harbored advanced, intelligent life, shouldn’t we have seen some kind of evidence of their past existence, since this would equal 100,000 civilizations?

Great question! Complicated answer. Let’s start by looking Earthward at ourselves, then we’ll compare that looking spaceward toward the stars.

As you know, homosapiens are the advanced, intelligent life form on Earth which is now technologically advanced and space faring.

Now by some estimates, humans have been on this planet only for the last 200,000 years, or one fifth of one million years. There are a thousand million years in a billion years, and the Earth is about 4.54 billion years old. So, humans have been on Earth for only a tiny fraction of Earth’s existence. Here’s a graphic to illustrate that point and more to follow below.

This image illustrates what it would look like on a 24 hour clock comparing the age of Earth to the presence of humans. In fact, life itself has existed on Earth for less of half the lifespan of the planet, what to speak of humans.

So you can see, even though we have a planet in the goldilocks orbital region around our sun, someone looking at Earth many light years away would not see humans even though humans are here, because the light or radio waves haven’t reached them. They would assume this a dead planet. Humans have existed on this planet, in terms of a 24 hour clock, 1 minute and 17 seconds. In terms of exploring space, for less than 1 second.

You see, just because humans have been on Earth about 200,000 years doesn’t mean humans have been emitting radio waves and exploring space for all that time. In fact, we only began exploring space 60 years ago and emitting radio waves for a couple of hundred years. In the history of Earth, we have explored space (in terms of a 24 hour clock) for only a flash of a portion of a second.

That’s us. Now let’s look at the stars.

Let’s say there are 100,000 planets with advanced life like humans on them right now.

However, since the galaxy is 200,000 light years across, someone on a planet on the other side of the galaxy from us would not be visible to us. We’d see that as a planet with no human-like people because it would take light and radio waves 200,000 years to reach us. Now take into consideration that of the 100,000 planets with human-like people on them (as you suggest in your question), it took us 200,000 years to get to the point of emitting radio waves and exploring space. Hence, we’re looking for a very narrow window in a planet’s lifespan that intelligent life might be detected. Not only a tiny fraction of the planet’s existence has it had intelligent life, but only a tiny fraction of the time the intelligent life existed there were they able to emit radio waves and explore space, even if all conditions were favorable for that planet to eventually develop intelligent life.

Furthermore, the sky is very big. Looking for exoplanets, we have explored less than 3% of the total sky so far.

Put all of that together and the chance we would have detected other intelligent life is almost nil to date, even though it might still be out there somewhere. The guy below might be the exception.

What are we missing logistically to be able to colonize on Mars?

Great question: “What are we missing logistically to be able to colonize on Mars?|

  • A breathable atmosphere.
  • Nitrogen in the soil to grow stuff (there is none)
  • Temperature range (presently it goes below a hundred degrees below zero).
  • Lack of an organized magnetic field to protect people from the sun.
  • A thin atmosphere equivalent to living way above mount everest on Earth.
  • It’s a long, long far far away. The moon is better.

Why do you think we should even consider colonizing Mars? We can’t even colonize our own planet successfully what to speak of Mars!

Can we “Bleed” Venus’s atmosphere as a way to terraform it?

Venus is Earth’s sister planet. It has almost the same size and gravity as Earth.

As you know, the Venus atmosphere is extremely harsh. So bleeding into space would be one way to make the planet more friendly to people.

The one big thing about Venus is that it’s atmosphere is way thicker than Earth’s. There’s no known technology that could somehow siphon all the air from Venus and send it adrift in space anymore than we could siphon all our CO2 on Earth into space.

Why should we focus our “space efforts” on Venus, instead of Mars?

Well, in my opinion we should focus on the Moon.

As for Mars vs. Venus, both have unbreathable atmospheres. Mars is very cold, hundreds of degrees below zero cold. Venus is hot, melt stuff in a few minutes hot.

Mars doesn’t have rain or surface liquid water.

Venus also doesn’t have liquid water on the surface, but it does rain. The problem is it’s raining sulfuric acid.

Any probes we’ve tried sending to Venus have become dysfunctional within minutes.