Can we “Bleed” Venus’s atmosphere as a way to terraform it?

Venus is Earth’s sister planet. It has almost the same size and gravity as Earth.

As you know, the Venus atmosphere is extremely harsh. So bleeding into space would be one way to make the planet more friendly to people.

The one big thing about Venus is that it’s atmosphere is way thicker than Earth’s. There’s no known technology that could somehow siphon all the air from Venus and send it adrift in space anymore than we could siphon all our CO2 on Earth into space.

What are the chances of two planets from the same solar system having sentient species that reach space exploration around the same time?

This is a great question, but unfortunately no one will be able to give a definitive answer as to the chances.

This is simply because we do not yet know if life exists anywhere other than Earth. It is still within the realm of possibility that Earth is the only place where any kind of life, what to speak sentient life, exists.

Finding such life would be an affront to many religions that contend that God created life on Earth only, and therefore finding even a fossil of a microbe on another celestial body would be the holy grail of science and have reverberating effects throughout human society. The theory of evolution would be proven.

It is believed to be highly likely that life does exist elsewhere in the universe simply by the laws of probability, but that being said, we have found no evidence to support this theory.

So now we can come back to your original question: “What are the chances of two planets from the same solar system having sentient species that reach space exploration around the same time?” Based on the fact that life has not been discovered anywhere, the chances to sentient life forms existing in the same solar system is practically nil (but not impossible).

Why should we focus our “space efforts” on Venus, instead of Mars?

Well, in my opinion we should focus on the Moon.

As for Mars vs. Venus, both have unbreathable atmospheres. Mars is very cold, hundreds of degrees below zero cold. Venus is hot, melt stuff in a few minutes hot.

Mars doesn’t have rain or surface liquid water.

Venus also doesn’t have liquid water on the surface, but it does rain. The problem is it’s raining sulfuric acid.

Any probes we’ve tried sending to Venus have become dysfunctional within minutes.

GPS Block III on Hold

Since GPS achieved Fully Operational Capability on July 17, 1995, GPS has become an essential navigational tool for civilians and military alike. Keeping the system up-to-date has proved to be a problem. Originally the system was supposed to be up and running in February of 2016 but has been delayed at least until 2023.
The latest iteration of the GPS satellite array is called GPS Block III. These satellites must be launched (and will greatly increase navigational accuracy) in order to keep the Navstar global positioning system operational.
The satellites have already been built by Lockheed-Martin and consist of ten new, advanced satellites to be launched into orbit by SpaceX Falcon rockets. The hold up is the U.S. government wanting to make sure the hardware actually gets up there as they independently seek to confirm the safety and reliability of the SpaceX rocket systems.
The new GPS satellites will boost additional easier to track signals for civilian navigational uses and a Military code (M-1) providing anti-jamming security use for the military.

Why does the moon revolve around the earth?

It just moves forward. The moon isn’t stationary. It has inertia and no atmosphere in space to slow it down. It just goes. As it moves forward, the gravity of Earth tugs on it and it falls, but because it’s moving forward it misses Earth as it falls and goes around, again and again. That’s called an orbit.

Simply said.

Why doesn't anyone else besides me believe in time traveling?

I don’t know the answer to your question. However, consider this. We are not standing still. In time the Earth rotates around it’s axis, the Earth also rotates around the sun, the sun rotates around the galactic center and the galaxy is merging with Andromeda.
We are therefore moving at hundreds of thousands of miles per hour in space. Fast forward 10 seconds and you will find yourself in outer-space without a spacesuit!

Hypothetically, equally intellectual organisms are living on a near planet when and how would humans discover?

Hypothetically, we are living in an infinite universe. How far is a “near planet?”
If the planet is within a very close 200–300 light years, then there might be some possibility, within 200–300 years, that we might detect each other. If the life form is on the other side of the Milky-way, or in another galaxy, then there is no possibility.

sky space dark galaxy
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Did we “accidentally” bring new bacteria to the moon or Mars via our space exploration programs?

Probably, and that’s why terraforming is a bad idea. Inside the scientifically minded community, there are two distinct ideas.
  1. Don’t contaminate. Leave whatever planet it happens to be in the original pristine condition so we can study it. (This is the predominant, tree hugging concept.)
  2. Screw number 1. Terraform the planet. Make it livable for humans, existing organisms, if they exist at all, be damned.

That being said, we do try all we can not to contaminate planets we send probes to even though some microorganisms may have made it through.

At present, and probably rightly so, NASA does not want to introduce organisms to other planets – or visa versa – introduce to Earth organisms from other planets on Earth. We may have already failed, but we still try.

How many satellites are there, and which are there on each planet?

If you count all the little nuts, bolts, loose wrenches and pieces of demolished satellites as satellites, then there’s a whole lot of junk floating around Earth. Thousands of pieces that pose a hazard.
spacejunk

Around the moon we have about three functioning spacecraft but have launched far more than that that have, over time, gone dead – perhaps crashed to the surface of the moon. Then we have the odd Juno spacecraft around Jupiter, the voyagers I and II and so on. We’ve put more space junk up there then anything else. This is a fairly accurate artist’s rendition of space junk around Earth.

The Russians have put several probes on Venus, the Americans and Europeans put a probe on Titan, we have probes on Mars, we flew a probe by Pluto and orbited Saturn for a long while before crashing deliberately. We presently have, as mentioned, the Juno spacecraft around Jupiter. We have hundreds of functioning satellites in orbit around Earth.