What technology do you wish was never invented?

Technology is a product of the industrial revolution and is inevitable with civilization. Once people move from individualism to collective engineering we get into things like the invention of the railway and eventually the cell phone. It’s evolution.

Whether this means we will eventually destroy ourselves and make Earth into a Venus like planet with temperatures of 250 degrees and sulfuric acid rain is yet to be determined.
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What nobody is telling you about the cyberattack

By Wayne Boyd May 14, 2017: There are many aspects to this ransomware attack that have yet to be mentioned.

All of the systems attacked, it seems, are running older, unpatched, sometimes even illegally cloned versions of Microsoft Windows. The cyber attackers are using ransomware that exploits these older versions of Windows. Essentially they tell their victims that if they don’t pay their files will be deleted. If their system had been updated, then the attack would not have been successful. Everybody knows this.

Issue number one:

  • Microsoft demanded money for an upgrade.
  • When people didn’t pay up, cyber terrorists demanded money through ransomware.
  • Microsoft did not orchestrate the attack, but essentially they did demand money for already functioning operating systems. People were sandwiched between two parties, both demanding money to keep their system safe.
  • Microsoft did, after the fact, cave and provide upgrades for free.

Issue number two:

  • There are alternate secure operating systems that do not cost money to purchase, install and keep upgraded.
  • Save money, drop Windows, install Linux, run your hospital, package delivery company or government on open-source software.

Issue number three:

  • Bitcoins. The alternative currency. It’s legal. It is so secure, in fact, that the cyber attackers are demanding they be paid in Bitcoins. This is the currency of the future. I read in an article that Bitcoins was a form of cyber currency used by criminals. Well, guess what? Criminals use paper money too, and non-criminals use Bitcoins too..

New Google Earth launches with incredible new 3D views of our world at the click of a button

THE WHOLE WORLD IN YOUR HANDS

Tech giant reveals stunning update that allows users to soar past towering skyscrapers and mountains in stunning accuracy

GOOGLE has launched an update to Earth that allows users to see the world’s greatest wonders in all their glory.


Tech wizardry means that armchair travelers can see towering skyscrapers, tourist hotspots and treacherous mountains all in stunning 3D.

And your view is fully changeable, with every picture able to turn on a 360-degree axis.

The planet’s major cities and landmarks are all covered, meaning you can swoop through the streets, dodging, trees, cars, cranes and buildings that are all rendered with astonishing accuracy.

But one such landmark that isn’t covered is the White House, leading to speculation that security fears may have held back the project.

But top sights like the Shard in London, Mount Everest, the Colosseum and the Eiffel Tower can all be appreciated in outstanding detail.

The Future Yet to Be

What was envisioned didn’t happen and what wasn’t envisioned happened instead – and it was better.

We humans are a hopeful bunch, the civilized ones among us.

We dream of a wondrous future and stop not to realize we have now what wasn’t predicted at all.

Here is a list of items I see for the near future. You may be surprised or may even disagree, but these are very realistic expectations.

  • Do not expect we’ll terraform Mars and establish settlements there. Do expect more orbiters and robotic machines and equipment in space to discover more about who we are and where we came from.

  • Do not expect AI to lead us to self aware thinking machines. Do expect amazing advancements in tech we cannot presently imagine.

  • Do not expect intelligent alien life to be discovered or that ancient aliens once visited Earth. Do expect an ongoing search for evidence life may have evolved elsewhere.

  • Do not expect conspiracy theories to go away. Do expect science to advance our understanding of the universe around us.

Which historical event had the biggest impact on humanity?

There have been many landmarks in the evolution of history. Here’s my list of important historical events that had the biggest impact on humanity according to me. Although numbered below, they are in no particular order of importance.

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  1. The big bang.
  2. The creation of the Earth.
  3. The creation of the moon.
  4. The evolution of life.
  5. The first critter to stand on two legs.
  6. The election of the first black president in U.S. history, a country that formerly supported slavery.
  7. The original Star Trek TV show with Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner being cancelled after only 3 years on the air.
  8. The Wright Brothers.
  9. John Glenn.
  10. Rosa Parks not moving to the back of the bus.
  11. The Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis.
  12. The day the Berlin Wall fell.
  13. The Beatles.
  14. The Internet.

The History of the Internet

I plagiarized everything below this paragraph from somewhere, I just don’t know where I got it from. I found it saved on my Google Drive from a long time ago. It’s interesting, so I post it here for your perusal.

The history of the Internet begins with the development of electronic computers in the 1950s. Initial concepts of packet networking originated in several computer science laboratories in the United States, Great Britain, and France. The US Department of Defense awarded contracts as early as the 1960s for packet network systems, including the development of the ARPANET (which would become the first network to use the Internet Protocol.) The first message was sent over the ARPANET from computer science Professor Leonard Kleinrock’s laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to the second network node at Stanford Research Institute (SRI).

Packet switching networks such as ARPANET, Mark I at NPL in the UK, CYCLADES, Merit Network, Tymnet, and Telenet, were developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s using a variety of communications protocols. The ARPANET in particular led to the development of protocols for internetworking, in which multiple separate networks could be joined into a network of networks.

Access to the ARPANET was expanded in 1981 when the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the Computer Science Network (CSNET). In 1982, the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) was introduced as the standard networking protocol on the ARPANET. In the early 1980s the NSF funded the establishment for national supercomputing centers at several universities, and provided interconnectivity in 1986 with the NSFNET project, which also created network access to the supercomputer sites in the United States from research and education organizations. Commercial Internet service providers (ISPs) began to emerge in the late 1980s. The ARPANET was decommissioned in 1990. Private connections to the Internet by commercial entities became widespread quickly, and the NSFNET was decommissioned in 1995, removing the last restrictions on the use of the Internet to carry commercial traffic.

Since the mid-1990s, the Internet has had a revolutionary impact on culture and commerce, including the rise of near-instant communication by electronic mail, instant messaging, voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone calls, two-way interactive video calls, and the World Wide Web with its discussion forums, blogs, social networking, and online shopping sites. The research and education community continues to develop and use advanced networks such as NSF’s very high speed Backbone Network Service (vBNS), Internet2, and National LambdaRail. Increasing amounts of data are transmitted at higher and higher speeds over fiber optic networks operating at 1-Gbit/s, 10-Gbit/s, or more. The Internet’s takeover of the global communication landscape was almost instant in historical terms: it only communicated 1% of the information flowing through two-way telecommunications networks in the year 1993, already 51% by 2000, and more than 97% of the telecommunicated information by 2007.[1] Today the Internet continues to grow, driven by ever greater amounts of online information, commerce, entertainment, and social networking.

Vivaldi – Hey I’m into it!

This is not the “Official” Vivaldi icon. I designed this one myself and it works better for my desktop. Feel free to use it for yourself. I hereby donate it to public domain.

Vivaldi is a web browser. It works for Windows, OS X and Linux. For the Linux people they have a download for DEB and RPM people. For Arch and Manjaro people, I found it in the AUR repositories. For Windows and OS X people, just download it from their site.

Watch the videos. This is not your ordinary web browser. I’m really excited about this one.

This is not an advertisement. It’s a free browser anyway. I’m just talking about it because I found it quite accidentally last night and am very happy with it.

Check out these features.