Would you want to die on Mars (just not on impact)?

Woah. What an interesting question with far reaching repercussions!

Built into this simple question are numerous assumptions!

For example, would I want to go to Mars, and the answer to that is no.

Would I want to die on Mars? No. I don’t want to die at all, but when I do it will be on Terra.

Would I travel to Mars? No. I think we should go back to the Moon and colonize that before we even think of going to Mars.

Will we ever colonize Mars? I don’t think so. I think people will walk on Mars and do experiments, but I do not think Mars will ever be populated by humans.

Did we vanish?

In case you wondered, RationalThinking101.com has NOT vanished off the face of the earth, but is undergoing a major system remodelling from the inside out. We will be back online with thought provoking articles soon! Please check back again later!

Red Planet Mars 1952

I found this movie on YouTube. It’s in black and white. I thought it would be another B rated movie about green men from Mars. It was not.
A scientist played by Peter Graves, AKA original Mission Impossible guy, establishes communication with an advanced race of beings on Mars. Communication is done with radio signals.
It turns out Jesus lives on Mars and traveled to Earth to give his Sermon on the Mount. The messages from Mars reestablished the existence of God and causes the Soviet Union to collapse and the entire world to become Christians.
We never knew Mars was so important!
The movie, in the end, came across like a Sci-Fi version of Ben-Hur.

Upgrading to Fedora 28 from Fedora 27

Upgrading is slow but definitely worth it.

I am presently upgrading from Fedora 27 to Fedora 28, which as of writing just came out.

At the stage I am at now I have already undertaken all of the command line instructions and have rebooted the computer. The system has started the upgrade process in the reboot. It’s taking a while but I think it will be worth it.

In the meantime, I am without my computer. So I’m using my new Pixel 2XL phone to dictate this article. It makes a few mistakes but that’s ok.
I was once a big fan of rolling Linux distributions but sometimes found them unstable. Sometimes certain programs would just stop working, or the whole OS, which is part of the deal with rolling distributions. I always thought I wanted the bleeding edge of Linux software, something you can get with rolling distributions.

What what I found, however, was that I really didn’t have the stomach or patience to wait for those programs that stopped working to start working again or go through tedious and confusing steps to get the program that stopped working to work again, or get the whole OS up and going again.
I am no newbie to Linux. I’ve been using Linux since 1998. So in these 20 years I have used most of the major distributions, if not all. Pretty much you name it, I’ve run it.

What I’m using now is Fedora Linux. The reason I decided to go with Fedora is that Linus Torvalds uses it and he is the creator of Linux.

Furthermore, I discovered, unlike some other non-rolling distributions, Fedora Linux can be upgraded to the next version without reinstalling the whole software. Meanwhile, you get regular updates so your programs stay fairly bleeding edge.

Upgrading Fedora from one version to the next can be done easily either from the command line or from inside the desktop environment, (which in my case is KDE).

That’s what I’m doing now. I’ve upgraded, or rather am still upgrading, Fedora 27 to 28, all from the command line. It’s easy to find instructions how to do this by a simple Google search, or if you prefer, DuckDuckGo.

At a certain point in the installation procedure the computer automatically restarts to begin the actual update process. That takes time. Be prepared not to be able to use your computer for about 45 minutes or so, which explains why I’m dictating this article on my phone rather than typing it on my computer.

So if you’re thinking of upgrading, by all means do so. Just search Google for “upgrade Fedora 27 to Fedora 28.” Be prepared that this will take some time but it will be worth it in the end.

The process is now complete. My computer is back to normal. Everything is as it was but under the hood is the new Fedora 28 version of Linux.

Disappointment in Manjaro Linux

I’m really disappointed by Manjaro Linux. Not the distro, but the people. The forums.

The problem with rolling distributions of Linux is they can break. The cool thing about rolling distributions of Linux is you always have the latest greatest software, even if it doesn’t work.
Let’s take a look at Arch and the Arch derivative Manjaro. Manjaro is steady.
Take another look. Manjaro Linux forums are as unfriendly as the Arch forums. The entire line suffers from antagonistic people who, if they look at other derivatives they are scorned.
You may think a distro, or derivative, community is not important, but eventually, if you settle somewhere, you’ll need to talk to people who run that derivative.
Look away.
Arch people hate non-Arch people. Manjaro people hate non-Manjaro people.
Go with Antergos.
It’s a derivative. It’s solid. It works. The forums are small, but non-critical.