Why are we so obsessed with finding the smallest amount of life on another planet when we have amazing life that we take for granted here on Earth and we destroy it?

We have no proof life exists anywhere in the universe other than Earth. Given a planet with the right conditions, life can spring from matter and eventually evolve into something greater is the wet dream of science, but still an unproven theory.

I don’t think this scientific quest detracts from our appreciation for all the wonderful things we have here on Earth.

You’re right. We need to do both.

However, just why are scientists “so obsessed” with “finding the smallest amount of life on another planet” in the first place, and why are people taking life for granted here on Earth and destroying it?

First, the searching for life in space boils down to an ancient feud between Science and Religion. Galileo (1564-1642), father of modern physics, astronomy, cosmology, mathematics and philosophy, was put on trial by the Catholic Church and convicted. This has never been forgiven.

We spend billions of dollars listening 24/7 for repeating radio waves, sending rovers to drill rocks on Mars, search the nearby stars for signs of “Earth-like” planets, and so on just to have at least some evidence that life has evolved on some other planet in the galaxy or moon in our solar system. It’s such an important endeavor that finding an alien and a UFO from space would delight scientists. If only. Unfortunately, we don’t even have a fossil of a microbe from space. No evidence at all.

We have no proof life exists anywhere in the universe other than Earth. Given a planet with the right conditions, life can spring from matter and eventually evolve into something greater. No God required. It’s the wet dream of science, but still an unproven theory.

Second, people taking life for granted here on Earth and destroying it because – even in our schools – children are being brainwashed to believe the Earth was created 4,000 years ago and not 4.5 billion years ago, and that God created life on Earth and all life and things on Earth are meant for the descendants of Adam and Eve to rule over and enjoy. That mentality drives people not to care about what we do to Earth.

We know our universe is 13 billion years old and contains over 2 trillion galaxies full of billions of stars each, so why is the idea of alien life still greeted with ridicule?

Not ridicule exactly, but needing proof of which we have none.

To date, not even a fossil of a microbe of alien life has ever been found. We do not have any proof that life exists anywhere else other than Earth, although we really would like to have that proof and it’s likely that life does exist elsewhere.

Proof that life evolved elsewhere than Earth would also be proof that science is right and religion is wrong, but we don’t have the proof. Maybe one day we’ll be able to make up for the fact that Galileo was imprisoned by the Church.

Would you say it’s a miracle that earth developed in just the right way in order for us to exist? Or Is it even more miraculous that humans could adapt and become the masters of this planet?

If not miraculous, then pretty darn incredibly fortunate for us.

So far, as we study our planet and the places we either visit directly or send our robots to, we haven’t found any other place with life on it. Finding life on another planet would be great. It would prove it wasn’t a “miracle” for life to develop, but just an inevitable developmental cycle of a planet with just the right conditions.

This is one of the main goals of all space research right now – to disprove the miracle theory.

So it might be called semantics, a miracle, or natural evolution of the universe? You tell me! Scientists would say not.

Who are they and where do they come from? 

ufo-overwater

Who are they? Where do they come from? First, let’s talk common sense, then I’ll tell you why, in my family, people believe in UFOs.

They’re not coming from space.

I’ve written many articles on how the vastness of space is not traversable because a light year is a lot further than people really think. My conclusion as a layman with some background in science, and after following the writings of many astrophysicists and astronomers and pragmatists, is that UFO’s, whatever they be, are not from other planets.

We are not being visited by aliens simply for the same reason we are not visiting them. Neither knows the other exists and traveling the vastness of space would take many lifetimes. Why do I say that?

Our closest star, Alpha Centauri, is about 4.4 light years away. That number “4.4” misleads us to think that’s not very far, but it’s further away than you can imagine, and that’s just the closest star. This is a distance of about 5.88 trillion miles away, and there’s another number we can deal with: 5.88 (trillion miles).

Let’s see how long it would take to travel that distance and go the fastest we can.

We’ll start with the correct assumption no one can go faster than light. This is not some “law” of physics that can one day be “broken.” It’s just the way things are. Period. For us, for aliens.

So far the fastest we’ve ever gone was on July 4, 2016, when the Juno spacecraft, assisted by Jupiter’s gravity got up to approximately 165,000 miles per hour (265,000 km/h), breaking all previous space speed records. Previous to that the record was 157,000 mph set by the 2 Helios spacecrafts as they sped near the sun in the mid 1970s. These are the fastest speeds we can achieve, and they are done with gravity assists.

But that’s not fast enough to get to Alpha Centauri. Let’s somehow figure a way (the science is not there at present) where we could go not 10, not 20 but 81 times faster than the fastest speed we’ve ever before achieved. (That’s like going from 60 mph in your car to 4,861 mph – kinda fast.)

This would put us at around 13.3 million mph. This speed is phenomenal and quite honestly, not achievable even using gravity assist. It also happens to be 2% the speed of light. This speed is not realistic, but this is just for theoretical thought. The closer we get to the speed of light the more energy you need to the point of requiring infinite energy at the speed of light. Let it be known that going 81 times faster than the Juno spacecraft did is an unachievable speed.

Now we’re zipping toward Alpha Centauri at 13.3 million mp/h, 81 times faster than any craft built by humans have ever gone before. We’ve incredibly somehow achieved 2% the speed of light.

Bear in mind there are two problems we haven’t and will not address, but equally worth considering, is the time and energy need to both achieve this speed and then slow down from that speed at the other end of the journey. Deceleration takes as much energy as acceleration.

Never mind that for now. Let’s just say we can zip up to that speed and zip down to zero in nothing flat. Even at this incredible speed of 13.3 million miles per hour it’s going to take us 2,200 years each way to get to Alpha Centauri.

Now there’s a place more likely to have at least Earth size planets than Alpha Centauri. That would be the Trappist-1 system at 40 light years distant. That’s going to take 20,000 years each way. And this is just our neighbor.

Therefore, speaking realistically, practically, interstellar space travel is science fiction. The distances are too far both for us, and for any intelligent beings that might be out there 1 million or 8 billion light years away.

UFO people are kooks, nutjobs, conspiracy theorists, fanatics and prone to bad science and even fraudulent claims. In these days of digital imagery where we can realistically depict people flying all over space on the big screen, I’ve never seen an image of a UFO that I couldn’t do a better job creating on my Linux computer using GIMP.

That’s the party line. The science of space distances is outlined above. Nobody is visiting us from outer space.

So then who are they and where do they come from? 

I have a problem in my personal life. My mother-in-law, her son, my brother-in-law, and my father-in-law, all claim they saw one up close and personal. The story is famous in my family. My wife says, “Okay, so with all this science stuff you talk about, how do you explain what they saw? You know my mother. She’s not the kind of person to make up stories.”

So what do I do with that?

Here’s the story as told to me by two of the eye witnesses. I know, it’s anecdotal, but how does it figure in with my worldview?

Once, while on an early morning fishing expedition in the 1950s in a remote area of Missouri, USA, my mother-in-law, her husband and son, were headed through the darkness to a lake where they hoped to catch some fish.

When they came out into a clearing at the lake’s edge, there in the moonlight, hovering 3 feet above the water, was a metallic saucer shaped craft with lights going all around it.

The lake was only a few hundred feet across, and this hovering thing with the lights wasn’t making a sound. The water was not disturbed, but it was clearly levitating. The three of them began to walk all around the shoreline looking at it from all sides, when suddenly, after about 15 minutes, it began to rise up, slowly at first, and then zip blindingly fast into the sky and was gone.

That’s the story. Now these people aren’t making this stuff up. They never told anyone except family members – people like me. The story can’t be found in an UFO conspiracy books. They were not kooks.

And then what about that front page New York Times report about a secret Pentagon program and some “artifacts” being stored in modified buildings in Las Vegas? Hmm?

I don’t know. You just have to be like me. Scratch my head.

Maybe there is stuff going on that science doesn’t quite get, yet, like God and religion and UFOs.

Unfriended

Rationalthinking101.com is my blog and whenever I post to it, like now, it’s setup to share my post both on Twitter and Facebook.

Since I live in Texas, I’m in the Trump Bible Belt. I’ve got friends here and I work for the state, but in a recent survey I discovered most of my Texan friends don’t believe in rational science and definitely support Trump. They believe Earth was created 6,000 years ago (even though many Christians believe otherwise) and that Trump is the best president ever (mind boggling to me – don’t they keep up?).

These views make their way to RationalThinking101.com and as a result trickle to Facebook and Twitter. Once in awhile (not every day, mind you), I get a notification that some person I worked with for years and years has unfriended me.

How can that be? I accepted them as my friend and coworker, can they not do the same?

Of course, I’ve got many Texan friends on Facebook and 99.99% of them remain my friends, the occasional dropout makes me sad.

Here are a few of my views. If you don’t like ’em, get rid of me, but I still like you as a person.

  1. Earth is over 4 billion years old.
  2. Trump is a bad president.
  3. I was born in Boonton, New Jersey. I’m a democrat.
  4. We went to the moon.
  5. The Earth is not flat.
  6. Global warming is real. The main contributor is the State of Texas. Look it up.
  7. I get along with pretty much everybody even if politically I bite my lip. (I was afraid, during the last election, to put posters in my yard. I feared for my family and my home.)
  8. I own guns with real bullets. When I was a kid I owned a BB gun.
  9. I don’t eat meat. I’ve been a vegetarian for over 44 years.
  10. I don’t care if you’re gay, lesbian, bi, straight, black, green, yellow, white or from another planet.

There ya go.

JoeDropsBall5

Do you think life on other planets will ever be found?

Some of my readers embrace my pessimism. Some hate it!

Finding life on other planets is the Holy Grail of science. The final punch in the age-old fight between scientists and creationists. It runs deep.

It would finally prove life can exist elsewhere. To date no proof exists.

There are candidates right here in our own solar system with some moons in orbit around Saturn and Jupiter. They are going to spend a lot of money to look. They had hope for Mars. That hope faded quickly when we realized Mars is dead.

My gut feeling is on the side of pessimism, though.