Why do scientists think there might be life on earth like planets when aliens might survive hot temperatures with no water?

Good point. Great question. We just look for the most “likely” places life might develop. Interestingly, though, there are lifeforms like the ones you describe here on Planet Earth!

You can find these lifeforms in Chile, specifically the Atacama desert. This place is burning hot and has had no significant rainfall in at least 250 years.

According to express.co.uk “While in the central valleys [of the Atacama desert], researchers found 70 species of microorganisms and further inland, the team made another shocking discovery.” What they found, 1 meter deep, was actual living bacteria.

Life does exist in extreme conditions sometimes on Earth. Why not elsewhere, like Mars for instance?

So far, however, we haven’t found any life or former evidence of life, anywhere except here on Earth.

It leads us to believe that if life is out there somewhere, the most likely place to find it would be in conditions that are similar to various climates and places on Earth.

Do you believe that there is life beyond our Earth? Do you think we will encounter it in this lifetime?

You have two questions. Do I believe there is life beyond Earth.


Do I think we will encounter it within “this” lifetime.

Who are you talking about, me or you? I’m 64 years old.

Not within my lifetime, anyway. Maybe within yours, but I doubt it. It is more likely a few hundred years from now if any life exists at all in our solar system besides here on Earth.

Any extraterrestrial life that we do encounter within our lifetimes will either be single cell bacteria or simple multi-celled micro-organisms. We would discover those life forms on the moons of Jupiter or Saturn like Titan or Europa. To get there we will have to send a probe and remotely borrow a mile or two through solid ice. Then they would have to release a robotic submarine snoop around. That submarine would then have to have a way to transmit findings of life, if any, back to an orbiting receiver, which would relay that back to Earth. Just getting all that hardware way out there for that endeavor would take more funding then anyone will want to consider, if it even if such hardware existed.

We are not likely to have that technology within our lifetimes. Two, three hundred years, maybe.

Is it possible for a planet, such as Mars, to develop a liveable atmosphere on its own? What would it take?

Would you say it’s a miracle that earth developed in just the right way in order for us to exist? Or Is it even more miraculous that humans could adapt and become the masters of this planet?

If not miraculous, then pretty darn incredibly fortunate for us.

So far, as we study our planet and the places we either visit directly or send our robots to, we haven’t found any other place with life on it. Finding life on another planet would be great. It would prove it wasn’t a “miracle” for life to develop, but just an inevitable developmental cycle of a planet with just the right conditions.

This is one of the main goals of all space research right now – to disprove the miracle theory.

So it might be called semantics, a miracle, or natural evolution of the universe? You tell me! Scientists would say not.

If aliens really exist, why don’t they visit Earth? Do they fear humans?

In answering “If aliens really exist, why don’t they visit Earth? Do they fear humans?”, at least we agree. They aren’t visiting. But why not?

I suggest because they are in a galaxy far, far away and light speed is just plain pokey.

Even though we want to go faster than light (FSL) for making cool Star War and Star Trek movies, the reality is that not only is light speed impossible, getting close to light speed is impossible. It would take infinite energy to accelerate to the speed of light.

Even if you could go as incredibly fast as, say, 1/20th the speed of light (highly unlikely), it would still take 800 years to visit the Trappist-1 system with seven Earth-size planets. It could very well be that Trappist-1 has no life. More likely we would have to go out a lot further, perhaps across the galaxy or billions of light years to other galaxies to find intelligent beings.

Those alien beings have the same problem we have. We both suspect the other exists, but neither will ever know for sure because the distance is too great and the speed of light is too pokey. All we can do is imagine.

Given that NASA has landed on the Moon, why did they not put some plants on the lunar surface?

Wow. What would have happened if astronauts had brought plants to the moon? Surely by now the moon would be green! Here I always thought the thing was made of blue cheese.

You must know from the other answers that there’s no air on the moon and plants need air to survive just like you do. Another issue is there’s no water on the moon – no rivers, no lakes, no rain – and we all know if plants don’t get water they die.

However, I can offer you what none other can! Below is a picture of what the moon would look like if it really was green!

Do aliens who live on planets with natural conditions and resources similar to Earth develop technology trees similar to Human’s?

If aliens had something like hands with something like opposable thumbs and intelligence and a few hundred thousand years, then possibly they might develop technology similar to ours.

So what is an opposable thumb? According to an article on NSTA News: “Human thumbs are called opposable thumbs. They are called opposable because the thumb can be moved around to touch the other fingers, which gives people the ability to grasp things. Most primates (humans, apes, and Old World monkeys) and some other animals have opposable thumbs.”