If you were on the ISS, would the view of the stars be completely clear with the lack of atmospheric distortion and light pollution? If so why aren’t there more pictures of it from their pov?

You don’t understand cameras, do you? Well, a quick lesson then. In cameras (other than cell phone cameras), there’s a thing called aperture. When there’s a bright light the aperture has to be small, to let less light in, so you can photograph something like the Earth. This avoids overexposure of the bright objects in your photo. In space, this blacks out the stars.

However, if like the Hubble Telescope, you just look away from Earth at the stars, you see a whole lot more of them than we can see here on Earth.

Here’s a photo taken of the Hubble Telescope from the point of view of the Space Shuttle Discovery. Notice, because the Earth is so bright, we don’t see any stars.

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) floats gracefully above the blue Earth after release from Discovery’s robot arm after a successful servicing mission.

On the other hand, since the Hubble Telescope points away from the bright light source coming from Earth, we can capture images like these.

Venus, Mars and Uranus

If you look outside just after sundown, you will see tonight a very bright star towards the east. That’s not really a star. That’s Venus!
Venus is called our sister planet because it is very near the size of Earth and is on the inside edge of the Goldilocks zone. Scientists believe that if life exists on other planets then those planets must be within a certain Goldilocks zone from their sun.
Just above the bright light of the planet Venus, and a little bit to the left, you will see a very tiny point of light which is slightly orange in color. That’s Mars.
And just above Mars also to the left is Uranus. Of course, you can’t see Uranus with the naked eye. You need a very powerful telescope for that. But it’s there tonight and if you’ve got a telescope like the one below go have a look!
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkLRmQC7fR4&w=560&h=315]